Regaining running fitness

It always amazes me just how much fitness you can lose after just a couple of weeks of not regularly running. Granted, it serves me right for not sticking to my training plan – but life really has been crazy lately. I’ve been handed over more than 20 clients at work (lots of those are very quiet accounts .. but even so), I’ve had birthdays, work events, meetings .. And I recently started driving lessons. Phew!

I have to admit, the feedback from the biomechanical running analysis kind of knocked my confidence a little. Having someone demonstrate how bad you are at something that 1) you don’t feel you’re that great at, 2) you kind of thought you miiight be getting better at and 3) have enough trouble motivating yourself to get out there and do it already .. Well, it doesn’t really make me want to get out there and give it a go.

I sometimes wonder whether my half marathon actually happened. Did I really run 13.25 miles in the torrential rain, for a creme egg? Did I really push myself through a 3-hour, 16-mile training run in the bitter cold, on the verge of tears, nearly throwing my last half a gel at a horrendous little boy?

Was I really a runner?

Am I even a runner now?

I tried to adjust my running posture this evening. I tried to stop my arms from crossing my torso and making it twist – and my torso defiantly twisted even more. I tried to take smaller, quicker steps to reduce the amount of time my feet were on the ground – my feet moved faster, but I’m pretty sure I’d still be classed a ‘shuffler’.

It sounds crazy, but I feel like I’ve forgotten HOW to run. Suddenly, whatever I do it doesn’t feel ‘right’ like it did before, and far from maintainable! But how can I have gotten to this stage, when I was comfortably running 2+ hours just a couple months ago? I mean, I cycle 14 miles a day! It isn’t like I don’t do cardio!

It really goes to show that no matter how good a workout cross-training might be, nothing really maintains your running fitness and technique .. except running.

Has anybody else found this?

My shin/upper foot pain flared up before I even got 1.5 miles into my run this evening. I made it to 2.25 miles and ended up back at my house, with no desire to go back around the block for another mile.

Not even 3 miles. Where on earth did those other 13 go? And when will I get them back?

On a more positive note, myself and a few ladies from my office are running the 5k Race for Life on Sunday, in support of Cancer Research UK. If you’re interested in donating to a good cause, we’re £50 towards our £100 goal, and every little bit is greatly appreciated by all of us.

Now I’m off to stretch, and foam roll a few niggly muscles back into submission!

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2 thoughts on “Regaining running fitness

  1. You’re a runner. You go out, sometimes in miserable weather, and you run. That makes you a runner. You’re always getting better. Every time you go for a run, you’re increasing your aerobic fitness bit by bit. Which over time means you can run longer and longer distances. That’s constant progress and improvement. Don’t let the biomechanics stuff get you down. No one is born with perfect biomechanics. Even great runners like Mo Farah need to spend time in a gym focussing on their core muscles to help their running form. And these little niggles can be helped with some targeted exercises and stretches in your weekly routine. No one is a perfect runner. Be proud of what you’ve achieved and what you’re working towards.

  2. YES, yes you are a runner. It’s simple, if you run, you’re a runner. And thinking about how to run while you’re running is tedious and will take the fun out of it. Ask your coach for drills to fix your form (that’s what I do with my clients) instead of trying to fix things on the run, usually doesn’t work. Okay? And… more power to you if you did a half in the rain, Go Lucy!!!!

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